Kenya

African Women Mathematicians workshop, Kenya

 

The Commission for Developing Countries (CDC) released the results of the third workshop on African Women Mathematicians, held July 16-18, 2015 at Lake Naivasha Panorama Park, Naivasha, Kenya. The workshop entitled “Women in Mathematics for Social Change and Sustainable Livelihoods” addresses gender inequality in mathematics across the African continent. CDC supported the workshop with a CDC Project Grant.

The workshop is the third in a series of workshops on African Women Mathematicians jointly organized by AMUCWMA (African Mathematical Union Commission on Women in Mathematics in Africa) and CIMPA (Centre International de Mathématiques Pures et Appliquées).

Previous workshops being held in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso), October ,26-27, 2012  and the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (AIMS), Cape Town, July 17-19, 2013 respectively.

Gender inequality in the mathematical sciences across Africa and particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa is not as per the international norms and many organizations agree that urgent action is required.

The AWMA workshop brings together women from across the continent to a platform where they can present their work, exchange experiences and discuss initiatives that promote Mathematics with the aim of addressing social change and creating sustainable livelihoods. The workshop includes plenary sessions from invited speakers representing various African regions as well as international experts to address and facilitate specific themes of the workshop. The workshop also offers a forum where PhD students and women mathematicians in Africa may discuss topics effecting women mathematicians and create a permanent framework of meetings and exchanges. It also gives young women in science and mathematics the opportunity to meet role models and other professional women who have successfully pursued scientific and mathematically-oriented careers.

The primary outcomes of the workshop were:

1. The constitution of an email-list of all African women mathematicians to promote exchange and collaboration, the email list contains currently over 400 members and is updated regularly.

2. The setting of a brochure of role models of African women mathematicians to inspire young women to pursue careers in mathematics and encourage women already working in the field

3. The organisation of workshops for African women mathematicians in each of five regions of Africa (North Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, East Africa and Southern Africa). A workshop is intended to be held every other year.

Speakers included:

  1. Eunice Mureithi (Tanzania): Application of mathematical models in Fluid Dynamics
  2. Livingstone Luboobi (Uganda): Current and Future Trends of Bio-mathematics
  3. Selmane Schehrazad (Algeria): Mathematical Modelling and Applications
  4. Susanna Terracini (Italy): Geometric aspects of competition;
  5. Tony Ezome (Gabon): Cryptography and security of information
  6. David Malonza (Kenya): Gender issues and the uptake of mathematics in Kenya
  7. Josephine Guidy-Wandja (Côte d'Ivoire): Mathematician Role Models in Africa
  8. Salimata Gueye (Senegal): Increased access for girls and Women in Higher education
  9. Nouzha El Yacoubi (Morocco):Involvement of women in STEM for development in Africa
  10. Farai Nyabadza (South Africa): AWMA-SAMSA collaboration geared towards women empowerment
  11. Mpfareleni Rejoice Gavhi (South Africa): Mentorship Programmes for Young Mathematicians
  12. Adewale Solarin (Nigeria): AMU programmes for promoting mathematics among African Girls and women.


Enquiries should be directed Marie-Francoise Roy or Marie Francoise Ouedrago via e-mail: marie-francoise.roy(at)univ-rennes1.fr or omfrancoise (at) yahoo.fr