IMU Awards, Prizes, and Special Lectures

The scientific prizes of the International Mathematical Union of the year 2010 were awarded during the Opening Ceremony of ICM 2010 in Hyderabad, India on August 19, 2010. Shrimati Pratibha Patil, the Honourable President of India, has given away the awards (a medal and a cheque for each of the prize winners). Information about the 2010 winners can be found here. The slides (PowerPoint & PDF) contain the citations as well as the names of the members of the various Prize Committees. A video of the Opening Ceremony can be found at the ICM 2010 online streaming archive.

About two years in advance of an award, the IMU Executive Committee appoints, for each of its Prizes, a Selection Committee along the lines of the Prize Statutes and the IMU By-Laws. This includes specifications about the criteria of selection and instructions on how to act in a conflict of interest. The Prize Committees for ICM 2014 have begun their work. The names of the Selection Committee members remain confidential until ICM 2014, only the names of the Chairs are made public. IMU President I. Daubechies has invited nominations for all awards to be made, see AO CL 6/2012 and the nomination guidelines.

The International Mathematical Union grants four Prizes for mathematical achievement:

Fields  Medal

Rolf Nevanlinna Prize

          

 

Carl Friedrich Gauss Prize
for Applications of Mathematics

Chern Medal Award

The four IMU Prizes listed above are awarded every four years at the Opening Ceremony of the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM). The Fields Medal recognizes outstanding mathematical achievement. The Rolf Nevanlinna Prize honors distinguished achievements in mathematical aspects of information science. The Carl Friedrich Gauss Prize is awarded for outstanding mathematical contributions that have found significant applications outside of mathematics. The Chern Medal is awarded to an individual whose accomplishments warrant the highest level of recognition for outstanding achievements in the field of mathematics.

The Fields Medal was first awarded in 1936, the Rolf Nevanlinna Prize in 1982, and the Carl Friedrich Gauss Prize in 2006. The Chern Medal was awarded for the first time in 2010.

Since 2010 IMU also awards the Leelavati Prize (at the ICM Closing Ceremony). Since 2014 this prize is sponsored by Infosys. The Leelavati Prize recognizes outstanding public outreach work for mathematics.

About the physical medals and the cash values of the IMU Prizes

Selection Committees for the IMU Prizes

Nomination

Fields Medal

Rolf Nevanlinna Prize

Carl Friedrich Gauss Prize

Chern Medal Award

The Chern Medal Award, sponsored by the Chern Medal Foundation (CMF), was awarded for the first time at the opening ceremony of ICM 2010.

Leelavati Prize

The Leelavati Prize, sponsored by Infosys, was awarded for the first time at the closing ceremony of ICM 2010. This prize addresses outstanding public outreach activities for mathematics.

 


ICM Lectures

Although formally not an award, an invitation to speak at an International Congress of Mathematicians is viewed in the mathematical world as an outstanding honor. At each of today's ICMs about 20 plenary and 160 invited lectures are presented. The speakers are selected by a program committee of about 10 members with the support of section panels. The number of mathematician involved in the selection process roughly equals the number of speakers. Each ICM features also special lectures (e.g., by prize winners or honoring prize winners). Since 1994, the ICM Emmy Noether Lecture is a special lecture which has its own selection committee.


Other Prizes and Awards in which IMU plays an Institutional Role

There are several other prestigious awards worldwide that recognize mathematicians and their work, and that are appreciated and celebrated by the whole mathematical community, including the IMU. We mention here in particular those in which the IMU plays an institutional role:

The Abel Prize

The Abel Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.

IMU nominates members of The Abel Committee:

The Ramanujan Prize

The Ramanujan Prize for young mathematicians from developing countries, created in the name of Srinivasa Ramanujan, has been awarded annually since 2005. The Prize was originally instituted by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), the Niels Henrik Abel Memorial Fund, and the International Mathematical Union (IMU). The participation of the Abel Fund ended in 2012; the 2013 Prize will be jointly funded and administered by the ICTP and the IMU.

The Prize is awarded annually to a researcher from a developing country, who must be less than 45 years of age on 31 December of the year of the award, and who has conducted outstanding research in a developing country.